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Author Topic: Help me translate this Viral load  (Read 6825 times)

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Offline Jorah

  • Member
  • Posts: 113
Help me translate this Viral load
« on: March 29, 2017, 08:40:52 am »
Hello There,

How does 9.34E+5 IU/ml translate to the hundreds of thousands I read around and is this high?

Thank you

Offline gnatcatcher

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Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2017, 01:52:51 pm »
Jorah, it's only 934,000 (less than a million). My highest VL was ten times that before I treated, and there have been people here with a lot higher VLs than mine. (VLs do have a tendency to jump around quite a bit, so one reading is just one data point.)

Just so you know, the +5 is telling you to move the decimal point five places to the right. Here's a free calculator: http://www.free-online-calculator-use.com/scientific-notation-converter.html#calculator
9/29/71 transfusions
HCV genotype 1a
7/09/15-9/30/15 Harvoni

Before treatment:
Viral Load 9,490,582
FibroScan 19.5 kPa [F4]
ALT 262
AST 217
ALP 183

Most recent:
VL still UNDETECTED (SVR 102)
FibroScan 7.6 kPa [F1-2]
ALT 15
AST 20
ALP 85

Offline KimInTheForest

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  • Posts: 1,972
  • Believe in yourself
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2017, 02:45:03 pm »
Yes. What Gnatty said.

FYI: "E" stands for "Exponent of 10". So E+5 is 10 raised to the fifth.

Not a bad VL at all.

kim
Kim Goldberg (Nanaimo, BC)
1970s: Contracted HCV (genotype 3a)
2015: Cured with Harvoni + ribavirin (12 weeks)
MY STORY: https://pigsquash.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/undetectable-my-hep-c-story/

Offline Jorah

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  • Posts: 113
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2017, 05:59:41 pm »
Thanks both of You for the replies, I never liked math much. LOL
Good news that its not too high, hopefully that will help when treated.
Maybe the VL doesn't matter much before TX

This is what I was reading:

For each patient, the result can be described as either a "high" viral load, which is usually >800,000 IU/L, or a "low" viral load, which is usually <800,000 IU/L. Knowing the viral load before starting treatment is useful because patients with "high" viral loads can have a difficult time getting the virus to become completely undetectable on treatment. Patients with "low" viral loads have a better chance of getting their virus to become completely undetectable on treatment.


Offline gnatcatcher

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,372
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2017, 07:10:18 pm »
Don't sweat the fact that you're a little over the 800,000. Even though my VL was 10x yours, when I was tested after just 4 weeks of Harvoni, my VL was already undetected (which is the case with the vast majority of people taking the newer drugs).
9/29/71 transfusions
HCV genotype 1a
7/09/15-9/30/15 Harvoni

Before treatment:
Viral Load 9,490,582
FibroScan 19.5 kPa [F4]
ALT 262
AST 217
ALP 183

Most recent:
VL still UNDETECTED (SVR 102)
FibroScan 7.6 kPa [F1-2]
ALT 15
AST 20
ALP 85

Offline Mugwump

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  • My number of posts means nothing, piscor ergo sum!
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2017, 07:23:40 pm »
Thanks both of You for the replies, I never liked math much. LOL
Good news that its not too high, hopefully that will help when treated.
Maybe the VL doesn't matter much before TX

This is what I was reading:

For each patient, the result can be described as either a "high" viral load, which is usually >800,000 IU/L, or a "low" viral load, which is usually <800,000 IU/L. Knowing the viral load before starting treatment is useful because patients with "high" viral loads can have a difficult time getting the virus to become completely undetectable on treatment. Patients with "low" viral loads have a better chance of getting their virus to become completely undetectable on treatment.
That statement was true with the older interferon based treatments. Having a viral load that is expressed below E+6 or in decimal terms in the millions, means that at the time of treatment your immune system is doing a good job of keeping up with the infection.

The newer DAA treatments do not rely upon the immune system and stop the viral replication so even those with high viral load at the time of treatment have a much greater chance of clearing. Now if you have a higher viral load the only thing that is considered is a longer duration of treatment. So those with low viral load are the ones considered for shorter duration of treatment.

My viral load when I was originally treated with Pegatron in 2004 was in the range of 6 million. And being infected with genotype 1a, I was given the full 48 weeks of interferon and ribiviron. I achieved a 2 log reduction of viral load at 24 weeks of treatment so the treatment was continued because I still had a chance of it working. At EOT I was weakly detected and by 12 weeks post treatment my viral load went through the roof to over 11 million. It took over a year to get back to work and the treatment almost hospitalized me with low blood counts. 2005 was hell on earth and it took long time for my immune system to get to grips with the virus again.

The most important readings are the key liver function ones that indicate how well your liver is doing its job. Having a viral load that is counted from a blood sample does not clearly indicate how much liver damage has actually been done by HCV nor does the reading accurately indicate the current level of infected dying cells in the liver.

You can have good liver function readings and a blood viral load that is in the millions or you can have cirrhosis, with dangerous blood chemistry and at the same time a very low viral load.

All the best
Eric



Caution shameless self promotion below :-)
https://www.hepmag.com/article/eric-reesor-27742-782589663
DING DONG MY DRAGON (HCV) IS FINALLY DEAD!

Offline Jorah

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  • Posts: 113
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2017, 08:57:00 pm »
Don't sweat the fact that you're a little over the 800,000. Even though my VL was 10x yours, when I was tested after just 4 weeks of Harvoni, my VL was already undetected (which is the case with the vast majority of people taking the newer drugs).

Ok Thanks very much.

Offline Jorah

  • Member
  • Posts: 113
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2017, 09:03:49 pm »
That statement was true with the older interferon based treatments. Having a viral load that is expressed below E+6 or in decimal terms in the millions, means that at the time of treatment your immune system is doing a good job of keeping up with the infection.

The newer DAA treatments do not rely upon the immune system and stop the viral replication so even those with high viral load at the time of treatment have a much greater chance of clearing. Now if you have a higher viral load the only thing that is considered is a longer duration of treatment. So those with low viral load are the ones considered for shorter duration of treatment.

Thank you for this info, I understand. 12 weeks should be enough.

Nice rainbow in your Sig pic. I also love fishing...its like meditation out in nature.

Offline Lynn K

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 4,543
  • Get tested, get treated, get cured, fight Hep c!
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2017, 01:05:39 am »
My pre treatment viral load was 2.4 million. Also a 4 time treatment failure with cirrhosis for at least 7 years before my last sucessful treatment.

Still cured 2 years post end of treatment
Genotype 1a
1978 contracted, 1990 Dx
1995 Intron A failed
2001 Interferon Riba null response
2003 Pegintron Riba trial med null response
2008 F4 Cirrhosis Bx
2014 12 week Sov/Oly relapse
10/14 fibroscan 27 PLT 96
2014 24 weeks Harvoni 15 weeks Riba
5/4/15 EOT not detected, ALT 21, AST 20
4 week post not detected, ALT 26, AST 28
12 week post NOT DETECTED (07/27/15)
ALT 29, AST 27 PLT 92
24 week post NOT DETECTED! (10/19/15)
44 weeks (3/11/16)  fibroscan 33, PLT 111, HCV NOT DETECTED!
I AM FREE!

Offline Jorah

  • Member
  • Posts: 113
Re: Help me translate this Viral load
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2017, 08:42:12 am »
My pre treatment viral load was 2.4 million. Also a 4 time treatment failure with cirrhosis for at least 7 years before my last sucessful treatment.

Still cured 2 years post end of treatment

Good to hear..

 


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