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Author Topic: Greetings and my story  (Read 13044 times)

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Offline Foxtrot007

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
Greetings and my story
« on: March 07, 2014, 10:00:59 am »
First of all I just wanted to say Hi! First time posting here.

I been surfing this forum for the last month or so learning alot about Hep C. Thank you for your informative posts. I just recently tested positive for anti bodies for Hep C ( I am a 28 yr old male )

Last month I went for a full body check up since i became sexual active last fall ( I wanted to wait for someone i could be serious with). Everything came back good but for one thing, he told me that i contracted HEP C at some point since my last visit. He showed me on my results that my HCV Ratio was 2.00. He took more blood to take a Viral Load test and it came back Not detected and my HCV Ratio dropped to 1.86.

I told my Girlfriend to get test since my doctor said I might of got it from her and she came back with a 0.01 HCV ratio ( Thankfully ). I never took drugs or injected any needles, never had a blood transfusion, and as far as i can recall i haven't been in touch with any blood. So it stressing me out how all of a sudden how I have Hep C. Last summer I had a check up and i didn't have anything show up unless he didn't test for Hep C.

So at this point I don't know how to feel, its just very stressful. Is a Ratio of 1.86 bad? Can my Viral Load become positive? Is it possible to have a antibodies without getting Hep C? I have a doctor appointment next week when I have to give more blood... I hope for good news. I just wish I knew how this could of happened.

Offline iana5252

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 185
Re: Greetings and my story
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2014, 01:39:43 pm »
Hi Foxtrot,

Welcome to the Hep Forums.

Take a depth breath. Regardless of the outcome of your doctor's visit and tests, this will work out for you. Hepatitis C has a lot of treatment options available with tons more even better ones coming soon.

Here's our hepatitis C lesson on how hepatitis C is diagnosed.

Hepatitis C: The Basics: How is it diagnosed, and what tests are used?
http://www.hepmag.com/articles/2512_18753.shtml

Here's the part I think you care most about at this point...
HCV Antibody Testing: Diagnosing hepatitis C begins with an antibody test. Antibodies to HCV can be detected in the blood, usually within two or three months after the virus enters the body. If a person is positive for HCV antibodies, he or she has been exposed to the virus in the past. As discussed above, however, about 15 to 25 percent of people who are initially infected with the virus are able to clear the virus from their bodies, usually within six months of exposure. The next step is to look for the actual virus in the bloodstream, using a test called PCR. If a person was infected with HCV very recently, called acute infection, he or she may not yet have antibodies, in which case a PCR test is necessary to confirm infection.

Let us know how it goes at the doctor!

Offline Mike

  • Member
  • Posts: 999
Re: Greetings and my story
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2014, 04:24:07 pm »
The good news is that you don't have a detectable virus load. The better news is, if a load does show up, you can get treated and have a very, very good chance of clearing the virus with a short duration of treatment.

A lot of us - myself included - have had the virus for decades, have some liver damage and very high viral loads. Just a few years ago, this meant a minimal chance of clearance, long grueling treatment protocols and not a lot of hope.

This has changed for people like me with the new treatments. I can tell you the quicker the virus is detached and the lower the viral load, equals a greater chance of full clearance.

I know finding out you have Hep-C (you may have already cleared it) is a bummer.

But of all the times to find out you might have it, there is great hope for you. This is truly the golden age for Hep-C treatment.

Hang in there, and try not to get  bummed out or beat yourself up - you have some really great options and prognosis! Mike
Genotype 1a
Treated 2001 with PEG and RIBV
Treated in 2014 SOL+PEG+RIBV
Cured July 2014

Offline Foxtrot007

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
Re: Greetings and my story
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2014, 01:15:33 pm »
The good news is that you don't have a detectable virus load. The better news is, if a load does show up, you can get treated and have a very, very good chance of clearing the virus with a short duration of treatment.

A lot of us - myself included - have had the virus for decades, have some liver damage and very high viral loads. Just a few years ago, this meant a minimal chance of clearance, long grueling treatment protocols and not a lot of hope.

This has changed for people like me with the new treatments. I can tell you the quicker the virus is detached and the lower the viral load, equals a greater chance of full clearance.

I know finding out you have Hep-C (you may have already cleared it) is a bummer.

But of all the times to find out you might have it, there is great hope for you. This is truly the golden age for Hep-C treatment.

Hang in there, and try not to get  bummed out or beat yourself up - you have some really great options and prognosis! Mike

Its just frustrating because I wish I could know what cause me to come up positive for the antibodies. Its one thing if I had a blood transfusion, injected needles, or slept with a infected Hep C positive persons, But i didn't. But I am hopeful that I can beat this =) . Just curious, can a negative/undetected Viral load every become positive?  What does HCV ratios have to do with it and if it went down from 2.00 to 1.86 is that a good sign?

Offline Mike

  • Member
  • Posts: 999
Re: Greetings and my story
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2014, 05:35:06 pm »
I'm not a doctor - so I want to make that clear.

You're 28 years old, and may have been exposed years ago. Your body may have fought off the infection, and, if that's the case, you would test positive for the antibody and not the virus.

Generally speaking there has to be a blood to blood transmission. Could be as benign as using someone else razor, tooth brush or nail clippers ( it would be hard to transmit this way; but not impossible). Tattoos and/or body/ear piercings could be a possibility. There is research that suggests snorting drugs can lead to an infection, if the person shares the straw or rolled dollar bill.

I would speak with your doctor. You don't have detectable virus at this time. Have the doctor monitor it for a while and recheck the viral load in a month or so.

Although knowing how you got infected is important, the main thing is to get treated ASAP if the virus shows up. Your doctor should explain this to you as well. Make sure you ask questions when you see him or her, Mike
Genotype 1a
Treated 2001 with PEG and RIBV
Treated in 2014 SOL+PEG+RIBV
Cured July 2014

Offline lporterrn

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,969
  • LucindaPorterRN
    • LucindaPorterRN
Re: Greetings and my story
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2014, 11:38:52 pm »
Hi Foxtrot,
From what you said, it appears you do not have hep C. For an explanation about the difference between hep C antibody, and hep C virus, read http://www.lucindaporterrn.com/the-difference-between-the-hepatitis-c-virus-and-its-antibody/
The test you are referring to is the antibody test. You have a weak result, so not only do you not have hep C, your past exposure wan't strong. The part of your story that doesn't add up is you wrote: "he told me that i contracted HEP C at some point since my last visit." Did your doc actually test you for hep C before? Assuming not, then my first guess about possible exposure is your mother, so I would suggest you ask her to be tested.
Your antibody test cannot convert to hep C any more than a picture of a bear can become a bear. And your "HCV ratio" results, which I assume are antibody results, are virtually identical.
Naturally, you will need this confirmed by your doc. In the meantime, enjoy your new relationship and your life.
Lucinda 
Lucinda Porter, RN
1988 Contracted HCV
1997 Interferon nonresponder
2003 PEG + ribavirin responder-relapser
2013 Cured (Harvoni + ribavirin clinical trial)
https://www.hepmag.com/blogger/lucindakporter

 


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