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Author Topic: Toilet Water  (Read 15418 times)

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Offline Cherokee

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  • Posts: 3
Toilet Water
« on: October 28, 2015, 05:06:55 pm »
Long story short - I had to put my hand into toilet bowel water. Water appeared clean, however the what ifs are coming at me. Does the hepatitis virus survive treated water such as tap water. Is it possible to catch any of the hep virus' if scratches or sores are on hand at time of putting hand in water?  Thank you for your help.  And my phone didn't survive the toilet - stopped working.

Offline Lynn K

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  • Member
  • Posts: 4,377
  • Get tested, get treated, get cured, fight Hep c!
Re: Toilet Water
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2015, 08:57:17 pm »
Hep c is transmitted by blood to blood contact not by hand in toilet water.

Hep c is not easily transmitted even long term monogamous couples of many years who have regular sexual relations without any protection one can have hep while the other does not.

Here is a link to FAQ about Hep c from the CDC:
http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/cfaq.htm

Hep A:
http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hav/afaq.htm

Hep B:
http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/bfaq.htm

Try putting the phone in a bag with uncooked rice. The rice may dry out the phone.
Genotype 1a
1978 contracted, 1990 Dx
1995 Intron A failed
2001 Interferon Riba null response
2003 Pegintron Riba trial med null response
2008 F4 Cirrhosis Bx
2014 12 week Sov/Oly relapse
10/14 fibroscan 27 PLT 96
2014 24 weeks Harvoni 15 weeks Riba
5/4/15 EOT not detected, ALT 21, AST 20
4 week post not detected, ALT 26, AST 28
12 week post NOT DETECTED (07/27/15)
ALT 29, AST 27 PLT 92
24 week post NOT DETECTED! (10/19/15)
44 weeks (3/11/16)  fibroscan 33, PLT 111, HCV NOT DETECTED!
I AM FREE!

Offline Cherokee

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  • Posts: 3
Re: Toilet Water
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2015, 09:11:29 pm »
Lynn, thank you so much for your expert guidance - so very appreciated.

Does the same apply to Hep B and the other forms of this disease?  Even if sores or scratches were on the hand there is really no risk?  And does the Hep virus' survive in toilet / tap water for any period of time?

I had scratches on my hand / even though water appeared clear worried that prior user could have had something that didn't clear completely when flushed.  It just happened so I can't get tested for months - you see any risk whatsoever?

So happy to read your results posted as part of your post. Outstanding news!

I sincerely appreciate your feedback.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2015, 09:15:28 pm by Cherokee »

Offline Lynn K

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  • Get tested, get treated, get cured, fight Hep c!
Re: Toilet Water
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2015, 09:27:25 pm »
I added links to the CDC FAQ for A,B,& C did you read them?

Hep B is blood borne it is similar to Hep C in that way

How is Hepatitis B spread?

Hepatitis B is spread when blood, semen, or other body fluid infected with the Hepatitis B virus enters the body of a person who is not infected. People can become infected with the virus during activities such as:

    Birth (spread from an infected mother to her baby during birth)
    Sex with an infected partner
    Sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment
    Sharing items such as razors or toothbrushes with an infected person
    Direct contact with the blood or open sores of an infected person
    Exposure to blood from needlesticks or other sharp instruments

For Hep A it is food and waterborne I am assuming you did not drink the toilet water

Transmission / Exposure

How is Hepatitis A spread?

Hepatitis A is usually spread when the Hepatitis A virus is taken in by mouth from contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the feces (or stool) of an infected person. A person can get Hepatitis A through:

    Person to person contact
        when an infected person does not wash his or her hands properly after going to the bathroom and touches other objects or food
        when a parent or caregiver does not properly wash his or her hands after changing diapers or cleaning up the stool of an infected person
        when someone has sex or sexual contact with an infected person. (not limited to anal-oral contact)
    Contaminated food or water
        Hepatitis A can be spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the virus. (This can include frozen or undercooked food.) This is more likely to occur in countries where Hepatitis A is common and in areas where there are poor sanitary conditions or poor personal hygiene. The food and drinks most likely to be contaminated are fruits, vegetables, shellfish, ice, and water. In the United States, chlorination of water kills Hepatitis A virus that enters the water supply.

I also found this re your scratches question

A: Hepatitis C is spread by blood-to-blood contact. Someone with an open wound would have to have that wound come into contact with infected blood in order for there to be a risk of transmitting the hepatitis C virus.
There is often confusion about what is meant by an "open wound." An open wound is one that is still bleeding or still oozing fluid. A wound that is scabbed over and nothing is coming out of the wound is a "closed wound" and therefore is not a possible entry site for the hepatitis C or other blood-borne viruses. -

See more at: http://hepatitiscnewdrugresearch.com/hey-can-i-get-hep-c-from.html#sthash.3yt6kCIh.dpuf

my results are my signature basically a time saver here in the forum so as not to answer the same information repeatedly

Personally I don't believe you are at any risk but I suggest you may wish to discuss your anxiety about catching an illness with your doctor have you considered counseling for excessive worry?
Genotype 1a
1978 contracted, 1990 Dx
1995 Intron A failed
2001 Interferon Riba null response
2003 Pegintron Riba trial med null response
2008 F4 Cirrhosis Bx
2014 12 week Sov/Oly relapse
10/14 fibroscan 27 PLT 96
2014 24 weeks Harvoni 15 weeks Riba
5/4/15 EOT not detected, ALT 21, AST 20
4 week post not detected, ALT 26, AST 28
12 week post NOT DETECTED (07/27/15)
ALT 29, AST 27 PLT 92
24 week post NOT DETECTED! (10/19/15)
44 weeks (3/11/16)  fibroscan 33, PLT 111, HCV NOT DETECTED!
I AM FREE!

Offline Cherokee

  • Member
  • Posts: 3
Re: Toilet Water
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2015, 09:40:37 pm »
Thank you very helpful. Yes, I read but was confused - it's hard for the non expert to understand this stuff. I'm a business guy who wishes he had gone into the medical field.

No, didn't drink the water - but I know I had skin pulls around my fingernails - all small but may have been bleeding.  The toilet had been flushed after the prior user. Didn't know if these virus' could survive in what is basically tap water.  There was no noticeable blood or other bodily fluids, but of course there had been.

I really do appreciate your time and expertise. Thanks for offering / participating in this educational forum. God Bless.

Offline Lynn K

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 4,377
  • Get tested, get treated, get cured, fight Hep c!
Re: Toilet Water
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2015, 10:20:40 pm »
In the information I copied above there was also the comment

" In the United States, chlorination of water kills Hepatitis A virus that enters the water supply"

Chlorine also kills the hep C virus as well.

The links are FAQ for the general public. The CDC has attempted to keep the information on the laymens level.

also as I posted above:

"An open wound is one that is still bleeding or still oozing fluid. A wound that is scabbed over and nothing is coming out of the wound is a "closed wound" and therefore is not a possible entry site for the hepatitis C or other blood-borne viruses."

I doubt your "skin pulls" would qualify as an open wound "one that is still bleeding or still oozing fluid" either they are bleeding or they are not.

Good luck
Genotype 1a
1978 contracted, 1990 Dx
1995 Intron A failed
2001 Interferon Riba null response
2003 Pegintron Riba trial med null response
2008 F4 Cirrhosis Bx
2014 12 week Sov/Oly relapse
10/14 fibroscan 27 PLT 96
2014 24 weeks Harvoni 15 weeks Riba
5/4/15 EOT not detected, ALT 21, AST 20
4 week post not detected, ALT 26, AST 28
12 week post NOT DETECTED (07/27/15)
ALT 29, AST 27 PLT 92
24 week post NOT DETECTED! (10/19/15)
44 weeks (3/11/16)  fibroscan 33, PLT 111, HCV NOT DETECTED!
I AM FREE!

 


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