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Author Topic: Acute Or Chronic?  (Read 6203 times)

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Offline rhythms143

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Acute Or Chronic?
« on: January 04, 2016, 06:25:42 pm »
Recently one of my friend being diagnosed with HEP B:
Can some one please  tell us  whether it is  Acute Or Chronic? based on  yours experience

HBcAB {Hep B core ( total )antibody} -- Positive

HBeAB (Hep Be antibody )--  Positive

HBsAg (Hep B Suface antigen )--  Positive

Thanks ,

Offline Lynn K

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Re: Acute Or Chronic?
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2016, 03:19:38 am »
Acute vs chronic is not based on test results per say but durability of infection

Acute Hepatitis B

An acute infection may last up to six months (with or without symptoms) and infected persons are able to pass the virus to others during this stage. A patient will test positive for the hepatitis B virus (HBsAg+), HBc-IgM, and possibly the HBe-antigen. Safe sex practices and vaccination of close household members should be recommended.

Symptoms of an acute infection may include loss of appetite, myalgia, nausea, low-grade fever, and possible abdominal pain. Although most people do not experience symptoms, they can appear 45 to 180 days after the virus enters the body. Some people may experience more severe symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or jaundice (i.e. yellowing of the eyes and skin) that will require immediate medical attention.

A small number of people have symptoms that last for months. They may have signs of abnormal liver function before they completely recover from the acute infection. Most infected persons do not require hospitalization, although some may require close medical attention.

Treatment of acute hepatitis B is generally supportive, which may or may not require hospitalization. Rest and managing symptoms are the primary goals of therapy. Additional follow-up blood tests are needed to confirm recovery from an acute infection or progression to a chronic infection.

That was a quote from http://www.hepb.org/patients/acute_infections.htm

In other words a hep b infection has an acute phase where the patient may or may not feel very ill.

A chronic infection is one that after the acute phase the viral infection does not clear on its own and the person is chronically infected with the hep b virus. I am not that familiar with hep b testing but I believe that once infected one would test positive for antibodies to the virus for life.

Antibodies are made by our own bodies while fighting the viral infection.

Here are a couple of more links but just to add the best advice your friend can get is from his doctor.

http://www.hepb.org/patients/acute_vs_chronic.htm

here is some info about blood test results

http://www.hepb.org/patients/your_blood_tests.htm

Common Hepatitis B Blood Tests

    HBsAg (hepatitis B surface antigen) - This refers to the outer surface of the hepatitis B virus that triggers an antibody response. A "positive" or "reactive" HBsAg test result means that the person is infected with the hepatitis B virus. This can be an "acute" or a "chronic" infection. Infected people can pass the virus on to others through their blood.

    HBsAb or anti-HBs (hepatitis B surface antibody) - This refers to the protective antibody that is produced in response to an infection. It appears when a person has recovered from an acute infection and cleared the virus (usually within six months) or responded successfully to the hepatitis B vaccine shots. A "positive" or "reactive" HBsAb (or anti-HBs) test result indicates that a person is "immune" to any future hepatitis B infection and is no longer contagious. This test is not routinely included in blood bank screenings.

    HBcAb or anti-HBc (hepatitis B core antibody) - This refers to an antibody that is produced in response to the core-antigen, a component of the hepatitis B virus. However, this is not a protective antibody. In fact, it is usually present in those chronically infected with hepatitis B. A "positive" or "reactive" HBcAb (or anti-HBc) test result indicates a past or present infection, but it could also be a false positive. The interpretation of this test result depends on the first two test results. Its appearance with the protective surface antibody (positive HBsAb or anti-HBs) indicates prior infection and recovery. For chronically infected persons, it will usually appear with the virus (positive HbsAg).

Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public from the CDC

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/bfaq.htm

Good luck
Lynn
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 03:21:13 am by Lynn K »
Genotype 1a
1978 contracted, 1990 Dx
1995 Intron A failed
2001 Interferon Riba null response
2003 Pegintron Riba trial med null response
2008 F4 Cirrhosis Bx
2014 12 week Sov/Oly relapse
10/14 fibroscan 27 PLT 96
2014 24 weeks Harvoni 15 weeks Riba
5/4/15 EOT not detected, ALT 21, AST 20
4 week post not detected, ALT 26, AST 28
12 week post NOT DETECTED (07/27/15)
ALT 29, AST 27 PLT 92
24 week post NOT DETECTED! (10/19/15)
44 weeks (3/11/16)  fibroscan 33, PLT 111, HCV NOT DETECTED!
I AM FREE!

Offline rhythms143

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Re: Acute Or Chronic?
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2016, 06:34:55 pm »
Thanks for the information ,LYNN.

One of my friend told me that   "eAg is negative which supports being chronic "
I was in panic situation .

Offline Lynn K

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Re: Acute Or Chronic?
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2016, 07:34:07 pm »
Hi
So first thing I am not a doctor I am a hep c patient with liver cirrhosis but now cured of hep c. Your first and best option for medical advice and especially diagnosis of a medical condition is your doctor.

I see the result you posted in your original post:

"HBsAg (Hep B Suface antigen )--  Positive"

and the information I got from a Hep B web site:

"HBsAg (hepatitis B surface antigen) - This refers to the outer surface of the hepatitis B virus that triggers an antibody response. A "positive" or "reactive" HBsAg test result means that the person is infected with the hepatitis B virus. This can be an "acute" or a "chronic" infection. Infected people can pass the virus on to others through their blood."

So what this link is saying is a HBsAg (Hep B Suface antigen ) result of positive does mean a chronic or at least an acute infection.

But again I just want to just to stress I am not a medical person of any type and you should get this interpreted by a doctor.

PS if you do have chronic Hep B there is no need to panic yes that would be life changing news but you can live a full life with Hep B just follow your doctors advice.

Good luck
Lynn
Genotype 1a
1978 contracted, 1990 Dx
1995 Intron A failed
2001 Interferon Riba null response
2003 Pegintron Riba trial med null response
2008 F4 Cirrhosis Bx
2014 12 week Sov/Oly relapse
10/14 fibroscan 27 PLT 96
2014 24 weeks Harvoni 15 weeks Riba
5/4/15 EOT not detected, ALT 21, AST 20
4 week post not detected, ALT 26, AST 28
12 week post NOT DETECTED (07/27/15)
ALT 29, AST 27 PLT 92
24 week post NOT DETECTED! (10/19/15)
44 weeks (3/11/16)  fibroscan 33, PLT 111, HCV NOT DETECTED!
I AM FREE!

Offline rhythms143

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  • Posts: 3
Re: Acute Or Chronic?
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2016, 11:25:18 pm »
Thanks Lynn,


 


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